#TBT on #JSC (May 9, 2013): Hero Worship


Believe It or Not… ♣

DETROIT (JSC) — Greetings, people. It’s once again time for another edition of #TBTonJSC. This week, we’re talking heroes. In the couple of days that have passed since Charles Ramsey became the most hilarious hero this side of Darkwing Duck, I got to thinking about what this week’s #TBT would feature and it immediately hit me. Anyone who knows me well knows that I’m a child of the 1980s (Not to be confused with being an 80s Baby — I was born in 1979). One of the best things about having grown up in the 1980s were the TV shows. In many cases, the shows had some of the greatest theme songs ever. Often the theme would be better than the show. Whether it was Diff’rent Strokes, The A-Team, Knight RiderMagnum P.I., Dallas, The Thundercats, or one of the numerous variations of The Cosby Show, TV came very strong. The TV of the 80s is why I think today’s television stinks. One 1980s show, however, had arguably the best theme ever: The Greatest American Hero. The actual name of the song is Believe It or Not. It got as high as #2 on the Billboard charts in 1981. It was legit. I was much too young to have seen much of the show’s original 1981 to 1983 run. I was just 4 years old when it was cancelled. In terms of the show itself, truthfully, it was straight basura on wheat toast. The premise of it was that this English teacher is visited by aliens and given a suit that gave him weird super powers. Unfortunately, he loses the instruction manual (!!!) and has to figure out how the damn thing worked for himself. The fact that show lasted two years, in my opinion, was that kick-ass theme song. Anyone who is over the age of 30 already knows how that song starts. Welp, in honor of Charles Ramsey, this week’s #TBTonJSC is the first of what will be many great TV theme songs from the 1980s. Let’s Go. Continue reading #TBT on #JSC (May 9, 2013): Hero Worship

Fair & Imbalanced: Why Journalism is Being Held Hostage…


♣ Apparently Getting It Right isn’t what sells these days…♣

In Journalism, there has always been a tension between getting it first and getting it right.

— Ellen Goodman, 1980 Pulitzer Prize winner for Commentary

SOUTHFIELD, Mich. — In the Fall of 1980, an incredible piece of writing hit the front page of the Washington Post. The story was so incredible that it held the city and country on the edge of its seat. It was a piece called Jimmy’s World. It was written by Janet Cooke, an extremely talented Black writer who spoke multiple languages and went to some of the best schools in the world. The story was about an eight-year-old boy in Washington, D.C. who was a heroin addict, often shot full of smack by his mother’s live-in boyfriend. The boy was a product of a rape. In the aftermath of the story being published, people in DC were aghast and outraged. Dr. Alyce Gullattee, who was the director of the Institute of Substance Abuse at Howard, claimed to know the boy and his family. DC Mayor Marion Barry claimed that the city knew Jimmy’s identity (irony abounds on that one). The story was so riveting that it was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. On April 13, 1981, Cooke won the Pulitzer. On April 15, 1981, she admitted she made the entire damn thing up. From start to finish, it was all a lie, from the boy, to the family, to the name. Hell, she even lied about speaking multiple foreign languages, and attending Vassar and the Sorbonne. She gave back her Pulitzer and was forced to resign from the Post (Then-Executive Editor Ben Bradlee wrote in his book “I can’t explain now why I let her resign rather than fire her on the spot for the grossest of negligence”). She became a pariah in the industry, never to be heard from again. No paper would ever think of hiring her. That was 1981. In 2010, she’d have been given her own blog and one hour special on Fox News. Let’s Go.
Continue reading Fair & Imbalanced: Why Journalism is Being Held Hostage…