Where the hell have I been in 2018?


PHILADELPHIA (JSC) — What’s Good Y’all. I hope I remember how to do this. 

2018-05-04 09.47.28To say that 2018 has been a god-damned adventure is putting it mildly. It’s been one of the weirdest years of my nearly 39 years of life. I can say — without question — I have had more “WTF” moments (both good and bad) than one man should have as an adult. It’s been nuts. I’ve also noticed that it’s been three months since I posted anything on this page. I even fell behind on posting updates on JSC Radio! That’s how wild, stressful, and weird that 2018 has been. Some of this, you guys know about, and I won’t rehash it here. A lot of it you don’t so I’ll explain here.

If you haven’t noticed, this post is going to be very unfiltered and uncensored. At this point, if you’re jarred by a few dirty words, you can leave now. I sincerely no longer care at this point. Either you like me or you don’t but you’re reading one way or the other.
Continue reading Where the hell have I been in 2018?

Flag Day: Tales of a Confederate Felon…


♠ That damn flag… ♠

This blog is dedicated to the memories of the nine people who were killed in the Charleston Massacre:
Clementa Pinckney, Sharonda Singleton, Cynthia Hurd, Ethel Lee Lance, Tywanza Sanders, Myra Thompson, Susie Jackson, Daniel Simmons Jr., and Depayne Mitchell.
 
WEEHAWKEN, N.J. (JSC) — In 1982, as a barely 3-year-old boy in Detroit, it was nothing major. It was just an orange flag, with a big blue X and some stars. To me, it was just a funky looking symbol on top of a really cool car. Yep. My first experience with that God-awful symbol of racism, prejudice, tyranny, and treason was on what was the first TV show that I absolutely loved: The Dukes of Hazzard. I was barely able to string together coherent sentences, but I LOVED the Dukes of Hazzard. I loved the car chases, the funny accents, the banjo music, and that really cool orange car, the General Lee. I was a toddler. I knew nothing of the sordid, gross, awful history of the Confederate Flag. So when I was old enough to start liking Hot Wheels cars the following year, I never understood why my mother would never, EVER, buy me the General Lee. The police cruiser that was always chasing the General Lee? Sure. She played it off as the police car is what my dad drove at work. I never really “got it” until I was old enough to start understanding U.S. History and learned about the Civil War. Only then, did it all make sense. Now, some 33 years after my first time seeing the General Lee, it appears that people — be it from a legit epiphany, long-standing guilt, or fear of losing money — have finally begun to smarten up. Let’s Go.

Continue reading Flag Day: Tales of a Confederate Felon…

Flight Club: Getting Over Fear at 37,000 Feet


I Had To Get Over It Eventually…

“Expose yourself to your deepest fear; after that, fear has no power, and the fear of freedom shrinks and vanishes. You are free.”

— Jim Morrison

HOUSTON — Easter weekend 1994. That was the last time I had set foot on a plane. In fact, until Memorial Day weekend this year, it was the second to last time I had traveled anywhere south of the Mason-Dixon (I went to Atlanta in 1996…by car). I can’t really explain why I hadn’t, but I just, well, hadn’t. That particular Easter, we spent it in Miami. A year prior to that, my family and I had gone to Disney World in Orlando, and Busch Gardens in Tampa. As a young child we went on Family trips almost every year. Most of them by plane. I LOVED flying. It was fun. I remember going to California 20 years ago (which was the last time I was on the West Coast). We went to Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Oakland. It was great. Disney Land was a blast. We’ve flown to Florida multiple times, driven to New York and Philly, made numerous drives to Chicago and Cleveland, went to The Bahamas, and even flew from Birmingham, Alabama after my Uncle Tommy’s funeral in 1990 (after a 14-hour cramped and hot car trip from Detroit o_O!) However after the Florida trip in 1994, that was it. No more airports, or baggage claims or connectors. Just 16 years of driving everywhere. And 16 years of hearing about plane crashes…and that little thing called 9/11. Suddenly hopping on a plane wasn’t very cool to me anymore. I actually wanted nothing to do with air travel and avoided it at all costs. Then along came NABJ this year, in San Diego. Much too far for me to hop in my truck and roll out like I have done for years. I was fretting getting on a plane but knew I had to conquer that fear that had built up for the last 16 years. Let’s Go. Continue reading Flight Club: Getting Over Fear at 37,000 Feet

Growing Pains: Words of Wisdom from a Veteran Grown-Up


♦ 30 is NOT the “New 20”. It’s The “New 35″…♦

“Maturity is a High Price to pay for Growing Up”

— Sir Tom Stoppard, British Playwright.

Before I get rolling on this, I apologize for going nearly three full months w/out updating this thing. I have been bombarded with so many things that this blog somehow got lost in the shuffle, which is completely unacceptable. So for you, what few consistent readers of this blog that I actually have, I greatly apologize and Welcome back.

Well, now that I got that shit out of the way, let’s get down to business.

DETROIT — It is June 10th, which means college graduations have already gone down and high school graduates are springing up left and right. First and foremost, Congratulations to all the new High School and College grads, with a special shout going to all the new Alumni of Renaissance High School, Michigan State University, and Wayne State University (BTW: “Alumni” is plural. “Alumnus” is the singular form) . This means there are a lot of new people entering an entirely new world, especially if you are from Detroit because about 75% of you HS grads probably have never been outside of Detroit for more than 5 days at a time. As much as my family traveled during my childhood, including: New York, Miami (3 times), Orlando (twice), Tampa (Busch Gardens), Los Angeles, San Francisco, Oakland, Atlanta (twice), Philly, and Nashville, I never really got to know any place other than Detroit. So when I hit Michigan State’s campus for the first time as a student on August 28, 1997, it was a legit culture shock to me. Bluntly stated: I wasn’t used to being around THAT many White people. That was just the start of my growth, and today, I am hear to impart my wisdom of 30+ years of living on you youngsters. Let’s Go.
Continue reading Growing Pains: Words of Wisdom from a Veteran Grown-Up