Crash Landing: The Detroit Lions’ Cruel Sunday…


♦ The More Things Change…♦

“The Detroit Lions are that family member that makes you blindly angry, and even embarrasses you in public, but you support them because they are still your family.”

—Jay Scott, aka ME, in the Sept. 8, 2010 edition of Real Detroit Weekly.

DETROITIn my 21 years of being an avid watcher of the Detroit Lions (prior to age 10, I was primarily a baseball and basketball fan), I have seen and heard some ridiculously brutal losses and even a few epic wins. There was the 1990 game against the Washington Redskins at the Pontiac Silverdome where the Lions blew a 31-14 lead and lost in Overtime. There was the 1991 NFC Championship Game against those same Redskins. There’s the 1993 NFC Wildcard game at the Silverdome against the Packers where the Lions led w/less than two minutes to play when a young QB named Brett Favre found a wide-ass open Sterling Sharpe for the game winning TD. There was the 1995 58-37 Playoff curb-stomping in Philly. The worst of them all: Christmas Eve, 2000. Losing to the then-4-11 Chicago Bears when you are staring at a potential playoff berth. If they made it, they might have actually done work. That “L” ushered in Matt Millen and the single most disastrous decade in NFL History. Regular readers of this blog have seen how at the end of it I’ve taken to doing a Walter Cronkite/Keith Olbermann-style countdown of the number of days since the last Detroit Lions victory. The Lions lost 114 games from 2001-2009. Included in that are two different 24-game road losing streaks, two 13-loss seasons, two 14-loss seasons, and one winless season! After all that, you’d think I’d seen it all. Then came yesterday at Ford Field. Let’s Go. Continue reading Crash Landing: The Detroit Lions’ Cruel Sunday…

Fair & Imbalanced: Why Journalism is Being Held Hostage…


♣ Apparently Getting It Right isn’t what sells these days…♣

In Journalism, there has always been a tension between getting it first and getting it right.

— Ellen Goodman, 1980 Pulitzer Prize winner for Commentary

SOUTHFIELD, Mich. — In the Fall of 1980, an incredible piece of writing hit the front page of the Washington Post. The story was so incredible that it held the city and country on the edge of its seat. It was a piece called Jimmy’s World. It was written by Janet Cooke, an extremely talented Black writer who spoke multiple languages and went to some of the best schools in the world. The story was about an eight-year-old boy in Washington, D.C. who was a heroin addict, often shot full of smack by his mother’s live-in boyfriend. The boy was a product of a rape. In the aftermath of the story being published, people in DC were aghast and outraged. Dr. Alyce Gullattee, who was the director of the Institute of Substance Abuse at Howard, claimed to know the boy and his family. DC Mayor Marion Barry claimed that the city knew Jimmy’s identity (irony abounds on that one). The story was so riveting that it was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. On April 13, 1981, Cooke won the Pulitzer. On April 15, 1981, she admitted she made the entire damn thing up. From start to finish, it was all a lie, from the boy, to the family, to the name. Hell, she even lied about speaking multiple foreign languages, and attending Vassar and the Sorbonne. She gave back her Pulitzer and was forced to resign from the Post (Then-Executive Editor Ben Bradlee wrote in his book “I can’t explain now why I let her resign rather than fire her on the spot for the grossest of negligence”). She became a pariah in the industry, never to be heard from again. No paper would ever think of hiring her. That was 1981. In 2010, she’d have been given her own blog and one hour special on Fox News. Let’s Go.
Continue reading Fair & Imbalanced: Why Journalism is Being Held Hostage…

Five Years Later: My Journey Through The World of Radio…


How Far Have I Really Come In Five Years?

“Do the difficult things while they are easy and do the great things while they are small. A journey of a thousand miles must begin with a single step.”

— Lao Tzu

DETROIT — Five years. January 5, 2005. A grand total of 1,828 days (counting the extra day we got in 2008) have passed since I drove that long and winding stretch of back roads on the outskirts of Lansing, Michigan heading into my first day at work at WQHH-FM. It was five months after I had graduated from the Specs Howard School of Broadcast Arts. It had been a year and a half since I graduated with my Bachelor’s in Communication after six listless years at Michigan State University. The day I walked into that small building, that more resembled a strip mall than a radio station, I was unbelieveably nervous and scared, and amped, and excited…and scared as hell! Those of you who have known me for years know how my odyssey in Lansing ended, and it’s not something I feel the need to completely rehash here. This blog is about the entirety of the road I have travelled since that cold day in January of 2005.

Continue reading Five Years Later: My Journey Through The World of Radio…