JSC Radio – Episode 4: Remembering Phife Dawg


RIP Phife Dawg. Get your favorite tracks from A Tribe Called Quest on Amazon Prime

PHILADELPHIA (JSC) —  I was first truly introduced to hip-hop in 1989, when I was in 4th Grade back home in Detroit. I had been hearing this music that the older kids in the neighborhood would play that was so much different from anything that my dad was playing in his basement and because my parents were so adamantly against me listening to it, it just made me want to hear a lot more of it. It started with early groups and artists like LL Cool J, Run-D.M.C., Salt-N-Pepa, Biz Markie, and Big Daddy Kane and eventually the first crew that caught my ear was Boogie Down Productions. What BDP — particularly KRS-One — did was introduce that love of lyricism that I STILL have today. By 1989, there was this group that I was forbidden from listening to. This crew out of Compton, Calif. named NWA that had this little album you may have heard of called Straight Outta Compton. That, of course, didn’t stop two of my older cousins from listening to the cassette during the summer of ’89 — these fools stuck the tape inside of my younger cousin’s Teddy Ruxpin and let it rip. NWA was like a revelation with their anti-establishment anger and energy. They were as much a movement as they were a rap group. They were like the Four Horsemen of Hip-Hop. By 1991, I was being reintroduced to hip-hop through a different sphere.  Continue reading JSC Radio – Episode 4: Remembering Phife Dawg

#TBT on #JSC (May 30, 2013): ’93 Til Infinity


“This is How We Chill…” ♣

DETROIT (JSC) — First and foremost, I promise you all that next week, I’ll be back to more than just Thursday bloggin’. Been kinda weird the last few weeks but I’ll be back at it next week. Guaranteed. Now on to this week’s #TBTonJSC. In the last few weeks I’ve had the privilege of mentoring a young lady who is about to graduate from high school. It was all fine and dandy until I got to thinking about a couple of things. This girl recently turned 18 years old. No, I’m not out here pervin’ or anything like that. This girl turning 18 means that she was born in 1995! NINETEEN NINETY-FIVE!!!!!! I was just finishing up the 10th grade when she was born. Yikes! This got me to further start thinking about how this year marks the 20th anniversary of my arse starting high school. Dammit! I got old quick. And while in the past, I’ve talked about the last great year for Hip-Hop being 1996my own personal favorite year for hip-hop was 1993. Meaning that most of my favorite hip-hop songs (hell, about 85 percent of them) came out two years before she was born. Oy. It is almost hard to believe that 1993 was 20 years ago. That year, needless to say, was one of the most turbulent and memorable of my then 13½ years of life. Of all the songs that came out that year, the one that is really stands out as indicative of that era was ’93 Til Infinity by Souls of Mischief. It’s one of my all-time favorite tracks for a multitude of reasons and it is this week’s #TBT special. Let’s Go.

Continue reading #TBT on #JSC (May 30, 2013): ’93 Til Infinity

No Apologies: My Take on the Black Class War…


♣ Discrimination is a hellhound that gnaws at Negroes in every waking moment of their lives to remind them that the lie of their inferiority is accepted as truth in the society dominating them.

— Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

DETROIT (JSC) — In the 5½ months I was largely AWOL from this blog, a whole lot of stuff happened. I can’t even go through an entire rewind of it all. I could go into the tomfoolery that was Donald Trump demanding to see the President’s birth certificate (never mind that anyone with half a brain and a 10th grade education, had seen it three years ago). I could go into the subsequent killing of terror mastermind Osama bin Laden after he was on the run, and I use that term loosely, for 10 years. I could go the sports route and talk about the NFL lockout, which threatens to torpedo part or all of the 2011 NFL season. Hell, I could always go to an oldie but goodie and talk about Detroit. But one story that really jumped out at me that I didn’t get a chance to touch on back in March is the shit storm that jumped off when Jalen Rose, and later Jimmy King (of University of Michigan “Fab Five” fame), singled out all black players recruited by and playing at Duke, particularly Grant Hill, as being “Uncle Toms”. Rose and King got very chesty about this, until the backlash punched them in the face. The full quote asserted that apparently there was something inherently unfair about a school choosing to recruit black players who can not only play, but are model citizens and strong students. The Nerve of Duke! Far be it from me to ever defend Duke basketball, but if I ran a program, I’d do the same thing. Well, the “Uncle Tom” alarm has been sounded again with the barbs being thrown at a familiar target. I’m here to say: Enough is Enough! Let’s Go.


Continue reading No Apologies: My Take on the Black Class War…