Off Base: Baseball’s Black Out is Real


♠ If you build it…  ♠

Baseball is a lot like life. It’s a day-to-day existence, full of ups and downs. You make the most of your opportunities in baseball as you do in life.
— Ernie Harwell
LAKEWOOD, N.J. (JSC) — The first major sporting event I can recall attending was in 1983. It was a game between the Detroit Tigers and Baltimore Orioles at Tiger Stadium in Detroit. You might wonder how the hell can I remember this so clearly, considering that I was just 3 years old in the Summer of ’83. Easily. My mother was leading me up the winding concourses and ramps in Tiger Stadium. As I’d figure out a few years later, we were sitting up in the upper deck along the left field line. After what seemed like an eternity of walking those ramps, it all opened up and it was the most beautiful sight my young eyes had ever seen. It was the field of Tiger Stadium. I remember it being a perfect, well-manicured green field; the infield dirt was perfect; the smell of pretzels and hot dogs was in the air; and the sounds of the game were everywhere. What should’ve been sensory overload for a little black toddler was nothing but excitement for me. I knew right then that this new game which, according to my mom, was called “baseball” would be it for me. The following year, the Tigers would win their (to date) only World Series of my lifetime and it was ON! What made baseball so easy for me to get behind back in the 1980s was the fact that there were so many big time stars in the game that looked like me. It was cool to be black and be into baseball. Now, more than 30 years later, I still love the game, but it’s a lot tougher to see that love coming back my way. Let’s Go.

Continue reading Off Base: Baseball’s Black Out is Real

The Future of Jay Scott Confidential…


♣ It’s Been A Long Time… ♣

“The best thing about the future is that it comes only one day at a time.”

— Abraham Lincoln

DETROIT (JSC) — Prior to starting this, I looked at the time stamp of the last post I put up on this site. Obviously, it has been a minute since I’ve been here, but it’s not because I’ve just given up on the whole blogging game. If you have even bothered to read the “About” section of this thing — and judging from the number of hits that page has gotten, you clearly haven’t — I said very clearly that “this blog will be my outlet to write in lieu of me having a regular full-time gig.” Well, in August, that dream was realized as I became a contributor to theGrio.com, which is NBC’s African-American news site. The story of how this whole thing came together is forthcoming, but I finally had a second to address what will be the future of this site. This was my original outlet. My true baby. I’ve been blogging like a mad man since 2003 on Xanga, when I was the furthest thing from being a professional journalist.  For the chosen few of you who pay regular attention to this blog, I thank you. Let’s go on a journey back to the last day I hit you with some bloggage: July 12. Let’s Go. Continue reading The Future of Jay Scott Confidential…

Goal Tending: The 2011 Game Plan of Success…


♣ Who Needs Resolutions? ♣

“If you want to live a happy life, tie it to a goal, not to people or things.”

— Albert Einstein

SOUTHFIELD, Mich. — So here we are. It’s December 31. The FINAL day of the year. Where the f— did 2010 go? I know what you are thinking: “Great! This asshole is going to give us a rundown of everything that he thought happened in 2010 and will give us his take. Ugh, I’m tired of that shit!” Well, much to your delight, I too hate those GAWD-awful “Year In Review” piles of feces that start cropping up shortly after you’ve just finished eating Thanksgiving dinner. So no, this is not some ridiculous 2010 Year in Review blog. Nor is it a blathering piece on New Year’s Resolutions. I despise those too. No one ever sticks to the damn things. You vow to quit smoking. You vow to lose weight. You vow to quit swearing. By Jan. 15, you’re sitting in your car outside of Mickey D’s eating a McRib, smoking a square, and saying “Fuck it”. This blog, the final one of 2010, will not speak of any of that nonsense. It will lay out what I plan to do in 2011. I am not making resolutions, I am setting goals. Resolutions are for dreamers. Goals are for those who are trying to get things done. Let’s Go. Continue reading Goal Tending: The 2011 Game Plan of Success…

Fair & Imbalanced: Why Journalism is Being Held Hostage…


♣ Apparently Getting It Right isn’t what sells these days…♣

In Journalism, there has always been a tension between getting it first and getting it right.

— Ellen Goodman, 1980 Pulitzer Prize winner for Commentary

SOUTHFIELD, Mich. — In the Fall of 1980, an incredible piece of writing hit the front page of the Washington Post. The story was so incredible that it held the city and country on the edge of its seat. It was a piece called Jimmy’s World. It was written by Janet Cooke, an extremely talented Black writer who spoke multiple languages and went to some of the best schools in the world. The story was about an eight-year-old boy in Washington, D.C. who was a heroin addict, often shot full of smack by his mother’s live-in boyfriend. The boy was a product of a rape. In the aftermath of the story being published, people in DC were aghast and outraged. Dr. Alyce Gullattee, who was the director of the Institute of Substance Abuse at Howard, claimed to know the boy and his family. DC Mayor Marion Barry claimed that the city knew Jimmy’s identity (irony abounds on that one). The story was so riveting that it was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. On April 13, 1981, Cooke won the Pulitzer. On April 15, 1981, she admitted she made the entire damn thing up. From start to finish, it was all a lie, from the boy, to the family, to the name. Hell, she even lied about speaking multiple foreign languages, and attending Vassar and the Sorbonne. She gave back her Pulitzer and was forced to resign from the Post (Then-Executive Editor Ben Bradlee wrote in his book “I can’t explain now why I let her resign rather than fire her on the spot for the grossest of negligence”). She became a pariah in the industry, never to be heard from again. No paper would ever think of hiring her. That was 1981. In 2010, she’d have been given her own blog and one hour special on Fox News. Let’s Go.
Continue reading Fair & Imbalanced: Why Journalism is Being Held Hostage…

Flight Club: Getting Over Fear at 37,000 Feet


I Had To Get Over It Eventually…

“Expose yourself to your deepest fear; after that, fear has no power, and the fear of freedom shrinks and vanishes. You are free.”

— Jim Morrison

HOUSTON — Easter weekend 1994. That was the last time I had set foot on a plane. In fact, until Memorial Day weekend this year, it was the second to last time I had traveled anywhere south of the Mason-Dixon (I went to Atlanta in 1996…by car). I can’t really explain why I hadn’t, but I just, well, hadn’t. That particular Easter, we spent it in Miami. A year prior to that, my family and I had gone to Disney World in Orlando, and Busch Gardens in Tampa. As a young child we went on Family trips almost every year. Most of them by plane. I LOVED flying. It was fun. I remember going to California 20 years ago (which was the last time I was on the West Coast). We went to Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Oakland. It was great. Disney Land was a blast. We’ve flown to Florida multiple times, driven to New York and Philly, made numerous drives to Chicago and Cleveland, went to The Bahamas, and even flew from Birmingham, Alabama after my Uncle Tommy’s funeral in 1990 (after a 14-hour cramped and hot car trip from Detroit o_O!) However after the Florida trip in 1994, that was it. No more airports, or baggage claims or connectors. Just 16 years of driving everywhere. And 16 years of hearing about plane crashes…and that little thing called 9/11. Suddenly hopping on a plane wasn’t very cool to me anymore. I actually wanted nothing to do with air travel and avoided it at all costs. Then along came NABJ this year, in San Diego. Much too far for me to hop in my truck and roll out like I have done for years. I was fretting getting on a plane but knew I had to conquer that fear that had built up for the last 16 years. Let’s Go. Continue reading Flight Club: Getting Over Fear at 37,000 Feet