The Future of Jay Scott Confidential…


♣ It’s Been A Long Time… ♣

“The best thing about the future is that it comes only one day at a time.”

— Abraham Lincoln

DETROIT (JSC) — Prior to starting this, I looked at the time stamp of the last post I put up on this site. Obviously, it has been a minute since I’ve been here, but it’s not because I’ve just given up on the whole blogging game. If you have even bothered to read the “About” section of this thing — and judging from the number of hits that page has gotten, you clearly haven’t — I said very clearly that “this blog will be my outlet to write in lieu of me having a regular full-time gig.” Well, in August, that dream was realized as I became a contributor to theGrio.com, which is NBC’s African-American news site. The story of how this whole thing came together is forthcoming, but I finally had a second to address what will be the future of this site. This was my original outlet. My true baby. I’ve been blogging like a mad man since 2003 on Xanga, when I was the furthest thing from being a professional journalist.  For the chosen few of you who pay regular attention to this blog, I thank you. Let’s go on a journey back to the last day I hit you with some bloggage: July 12. Let’s Go. Continue reading The Future of Jay Scott Confidential…

Fair & Imbalanced: Why Journalism is Being Held Hostage…


♣ Apparently Getting It Right isn’t what sells these days…♣

In Journalism, there has always been a tension between getting it first and getting it right.

— Ellen Goodman, 1980 Pulitzer Prize winner for Commentary

SOUTHFIELD, Mich. — In the Fall of 1980, an incredible piece of writing hit the front page of the Washington Post. The story was so incredible that it held the city and country on the edge of its seat. It was a piece called Jimmy’s World. It was written by Janet Cooke, an extremely talented Black writer who spoke multiple languages and went to some of the best schools in the world. The story was about an eight-year-old boy in Washington, D.C. who was a heroin addict, often shot full of smack by his mother’s live-in boyfriend. The boy was a product of a rape. In the aftermath of the story being published, people in DC were aghast and outraged. Dr. Alyce Gullattee, who was the director of the Institute of Substance Abuse at Howard, claimed to know the boy and his family. DC Mayor Marion Barry claimed that the city knew Jimmy’s identity (irony abounds on that one). The story was so riveting that it was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. On April 13, 1981, Cooke won the Pulitzer. On April 15, 1981, she admitted she made the entire damn thing up. From start to finish, it was all a lie, from the boy, to the family, to the name. Hell, she even lied about speaking multiple foreign languages, and attending Vassar and the Sorbonne. She gave back her Pulitzer and was forced to resign from the Post (Then-Executive Editor Ben Bradlee wrote in his book “I can’t explain now why I let her resign rather than fire her on the spot for the grossest of negligence”). She became a pariah in the industry, never to be heard from again. No paper would ever think of hiring her. That was 1981. In 2010, she’d have been given her own blog and one hour special on Fox News. Let’s Go.
Continue reading Fair & Imbalanced: Why Journalism is Being Held Hostage…

Ignorance is Bliss: Detroit’s Acceptance of Being Dumb…


Fat, Drunk, & Stupid is No Way To Go Through Life…

“If you think education is expensive, try ignorance!”

— Derek Bok, Harvard University President 1971-1990

DETROIT — Detroit is a place that on the surface wants you to strive to be successful. That is, until you actually achieve success. Once that happens, all bets are off. One of the keys to being a success, as I have always been told, is to get a good education and continue to learn even after you get the degree. My mother taught in the Detroit Public Schools for 38 years (1966-2004) and saw some of the most talented people of multiple generations pass through her classrooms. Succeeding in spite of the numerous deficiencies of DPS should be considered a badge of honor. Detroit’s schools, like many other things in this area, are the worst in the United States. Whether it’s the stunning 22% graduation rate, a mind-blowing 77% of 8th graders scoring “below basic” on standardized math test scores, or the widespread and rampant graft and corruption of the school system itself, Detroit isn’t exactly a bastion of higher learning. So when I read in the Detroit News this morning that the current president of the Detroit School Board, Otis Mathis, is essentially a functioning illiterate, I found it equal parts ironic, maddening, and insulting. Let’s Go. Continue reading Ignorance is Bliss: Detroit’s Acceptance of Being Dumb…